Integrating Muslims

June 17, 2014 at 11:44 pm 4 comments

I am oddly enough, a polytheist that frequently ends up defending monotheists- Christians, Muslims and sometimes Jews. I do this mainly when others make broad unfair generalizations against groups of people. However, I don’t necessarily defend their religions, as I don’t consider it my job to do so. Judaism is a tribal religion that follows one God, and because of this Jews don’t proselytize (though they may try get non-observant Jews to become more religious) Christians and Muslims traditionally have a duty to spread the worship of their God. Islam ascribes rights to Christians and Jews to keep their religions (including if a Muslim man marries a Christian or Jewish woman but not the reverse) . Some liberal Christians and some Muslims (Sufis in particular) view all Gods as ultimately being the same being, and so  I still consider that view a little arrogant, but I’ll take it if it means they’ll leave me alone.

Anyway, as part of my Irish culture tour in St. Paul, I give a tour of the St. Paul Cathedral, then we go to O’Gara’s pub for fish and chips and sing Irish and Scottish songs. Somehow the conversation while we were eating awkwardly drifted towards several people claiming that while Christianity had been taken out of public schools, Muslim students were getting “special treatment”. I wasn’t sure how accurate all of their claims were, and I strongly suppressed a desire for a flat-out rant. I ended up saying, well separation of church and state means we need to treat different religions equally, and not giving Christianity special status doesn’t mean Christians are being oppressed. I noted that I have a lot of Muslim co-workers at my other job, I don’t care about how they dress so long as they do their job. I also noted though that while I’m fine with people holding on to their religious beliefs and traditions when they come here, our culture can only accommodate them so much. Hijabs (head coverings) are no big deal, but in American culture, people will not trust you if they cannot see your face, so we can’t really make room for covering one’s entire face in job interviews, customer service jobs etc. That said, even with the large Muslim population in the Twin Cities, I rarely see a woman in a full burqa. I suspect most women who dress that way would not work outside the home based on their beliefs. That seemed to cool people down, and we switched gears by starting in on a new Irish song.

Anyway, I have been doing some research on how and in what ways Muslims are being accommodated in schools and workplaces. I still am rather careful of what I read, because there are a lot of people who do have an “all Muslims are part of a giant terrorist conspiracy” mentality. That said there are some instances where I do think some people have been going out of their way more than I think appropriate. I found this clip from a Canadian news show (if this was an American show, there would’ve been assertions about how “this is Christian country damnit!) in response to Qatar’s dress code policies it has issued to foreign tourists, and changes within Canadian culture to include Muslims. For the most part, I agree with what Anthony Furey said, the segment with Tarek Fatah gets into some issues that I am not sure about (such as the Bergdahl prisoner swap) so I’ll leave that aside.

Poking around a bit more, I found an article about how Betsy Hodges, the mayor of Minneapolis, wore a hijab while meeting with Somali-American leaders. I had to go look for a different article however, because it was misrepresenting Islam! I wasn’t sure what to think of it- I was not offended the way the conservative commentators were. It was obviously intended as a diplomatic gesture on her part, a gesture of respect. Did it come off as obsequious or weak? Or insincere and over-the-top to the Muslims? I’m not sure. Muslims do not expect us to dress like them. Wearing a head covering may be expected while inside a mosque (just as a kipa may be in a synagogue for men), but that is different- it’s a sacred space. When I’m in someone’s else’s home or sacred space, I respect their customs. She was meeting in a Somali mall, not a mosque. You can read her closing speech of her campaign here.

“I have worn hijab, and it changed me.

I have run and danced my way through the gay pride parade.”- This is just a very odd juxtaposition of statements. Now, what I’d love to see would be a group of Muslim women marching in the parade in hijab!

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Entry filed under: Christianity, Civil Liberties, Interfaith, Islam, Judaism, Politics/Culture, Theology. Tags: , , , , , , , , , .

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4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Rose F  |  June 18, 2014 at 1:16 am

    As a Christian, I’m always embarrassed by the assertion that Christians are being “oppressed” or “persecuted” by the simple fact of non-preferential treatment toward our religious beliefs. It does seem as though there are cases where Muslims are being over-accommodated, but it’s still extremely hypocritical for Christians to claim religious oppression on those grounds. Just my two cents.

    Reply
  • 2. caelesti  |  June 18, 2014 at 1:23 am

    Besides, there are places in the world where Christians *are* persecuted or open practice is somehow restricted, so that also draws attention away from more serious issues. For the most part, I think Muslims in North America are more likely to be discriminated against than to have people build them add footbaths and prayer rooms.

    Reply
    • 3. Rose F  |  June 19, 2014 at 11:56 pm

      Agreed entirely. Words like “persecution” start to lose their meaning when they’re used in such a way, and it’s far more common to see -any- religious minority be discriminated against than catered too. That’s a problem, and Christianity on a whole should be doing a better job of recognizing and confronting such discrimination. Going to get off my soapbox now…

      Reply
  • 4. Laine DeLaney  |  January 29, 2015 at 8:10 pm

    I have covered for Pride. I decided to re-post a post I made on my old blog regarding it; I’ll link it here. (And yes, it was interesting).

    https://paganchurchlady.wordpress.com/2015/01/29/hijab-at-gay-pride-my-covering-story/

    Reply

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